Choosing Between Anti-Embolism & Compression Stockings

Choosing Between Anti-Embolism & Compression Stockings

Anti-embolism stockings, also known as TED hose, are designed specifically for non-mobile patients or those confined to a bed. These are the white stockings used for hospital patients. They are low cost temporary solutions commonly used for patients in nursing homes and post-surgery to prevent deep vein thrombosis (DVT).

However, for ambulatory (walking patients who are not bed bound), TED hose do not offer sufficient support to counter the effects of gravity.  They are not graduated compression and only offer about 8-18mmhg compression. TED hose do not help the symptoms of venous disease and varicose veins. TED hose cannot be used for vein treatment and should not be used for daily support in walking patients.

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Graduated compression therapy provides external support to the vein walls and work in conjunction with the calf muscle pump. Compression stockings improve circulation while helping to minimize and control leg and ankle swelling.

In comparison, graduated compression stockings are medically therapeutic and designed for people who are mobile. Graduated compression means that they are tightest around the ankle and gradually ease as they go up. These can help reduce the risk of DVT in patients who travel by plane or car, and reduce symptoms such as leg swelling (edema), aching, heaviness, fatigue, pain from varicose veins and useful for pregnant women to reduce pain from varicose veins.

 

Spider Vein Treatment Animation

A very thin needle is used to inject a sclerosing agent along the varicose vein. Modern medicines used to inject spider veins (sclerosing agents) include polidocanol (Asclera), sodium tetradecyl sulfate (sotradecol) and glycerin. Discuss with your doctor the best type of solution for your veins.

Removing varicose and spider veins has never been easier. Click here to view a 3D animation that explains how sclerotherapy can make your veins disappear—without surgery.

Does Flexible Spending (FSA) and Health Savings Accounts (HSA) Cover Compression Socks?

Does Flexible Spending (FSA) and Health Savings Accounts (HSA) Cover Compression Socks?

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Flexible Spending (FSA) and Health Savings Accounts (HSA) Cover Compression Socks and Stockings www.compressrx.com

Compression socks and compression stockings are considered medical garments that are typically covered expenses Flexible Spending (FSA) and Health Savings Accounts (HSA).  Some FSA and HSA programs expire at the end of the year.  Consider stocking up on  daily compression socks and stockings or even give them as gifts. FSA and HSA cards are accepted at Compressrx.com

 

Thanksgiving Foods That Improve Vascular Health: Chocolate, Wine and Cranberries

How Chocolate, Wine and Cranberries Are Good For Veins

Foods that are rich in flavinoids may improve symptoms of venous disease. Flavonoids help protect plants from environmental toxins and help repair damage. They can be found in a variety of foods, such as fruits and vegetables. When we eat foods rich in flavonoids, it appears that we also benefit from this “antioxidant” power. In addition to having antioxidant qualities, research shows that flavinoids have other potential influences on vascular health, such as lowering blood pressure, improving blood flow to the brain and heart, and making blood platelets less sticky and able to clot.Flavinoids are also well known for their ‘venoactive’ effects on the blood vessels and have been proven to reduce symptoms of venous disease such as leg aching, heaviness and swelling.

Foods that are flavinoid rich include cocoa and chocolate, cranberries, apples, peanuts, onions, tea and red wine.

Remind the cook to use compression socks- long hours of standing in the kitchen can cause leg fatigue, heaviness and swelling.

Happy Thanksgiving.

BLACK FRIDAY CompressRX.com SALE

Black Friday Compressrx.com compression stocking sale starts this Friday.  All compression stockings and socks are 20% off plus free shipping for a limited time! Go to La Jolla Vein Care’s facebook or call us for the promo code!

Did you know that flexible spending (FSA) and health savings accounts (HSA) can be used to purchase compression socks and stockings?  Some spending accounts expire in January, but now you can wear fashionable compression stockings that offer medical grade support RejuvaHealthBanner all year long.

 

What Are Vein Valves?

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The valves inside the leg veins can be seen on ultrasound. The arrow points to a valve in the great saphenous vein within the leg.

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Leg veins have one-way valves that prevent blood from flowing backward. Diseased valves are ‘leaky’ and allow blood flow both forward and backward, eventually causing bulging of the veins, i.e., varicose veins.

In the circulatory system, the veins carry de-oxygenated blood back to the heart. The leg veins carry blood toward the heart, against gravity. Therefore, the leg veins have one-way valves the prevent back flow of blood. When the valves do not function properly, they allow blood to flow backward, causing pooling of blood. This  is referred to as venous reflux or venous insufficiency. Eventually, the backflow of the blood will cause varicose veins to develop and symptoms related to the increased pressure in the leg veins such as leg heaviness, aching, swelling, restless legs, night cramps, throbbing and pain. 

Highlights of the National Vein Congress

The La Jolla Vein Care doctors and staff attended the American College of Phlebology (ACP) Annual Conference in Phoenix last week.  More than 1,000 vein care practitioners from the United States and around the world attended the meeting to share information and research in the field of vein disorders (also known as phlebology).  The speakers included vein and vascular experts from around the world, include La Jolla Vein Care’s Dr. Fronek.  Dr. Bunke was featured in the daily congress newsletter as being the first physician to complete a specialized Fellowship program in the field of Phlebology.

La Jolla Vein Care’s medical assistants and vascular sonographers attended also to learn the most update information on a variety of vein topics including; complications in sclerotherapy, the swollen limb, thrombophilia, new anticoagulants, venous stents, compression therapy, vascular ultrasound, foam and liquid sclerotherapy, vascular malformations, lymphedema, venous system during pregnancy, venous skin changes, dvt and superficial thrombophlebitis, chronic venous insufficiency and research on specific vascular topics.

 

 

 

Dr. Fronek to Speak at ACP Annual Congress in Phoenix

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Dr. Helane Fronek to speak at the ACP Annual Congress in Phoenix.

La Jolla Vein Care’s Dr. Helane Fronek was invited to speak to her peers at the upcoming, American College of Phlebology (ACP) Annual Congress in Phoenix.  This congress is the country’s largest peer-education forum dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of venous and lymphatic disease. Attended by hundreds of vein care specialists, from physicians to nurses to researchers, the Annual Congress is one of the best opportunities to learn directly from experts in the field and connect with other medical professionals in the field of vein care. Each year, approximately 900 vein care specialists from across the globe come together at our Annual Congress. Participants come from all areas of the medical profession–physicians, nurse practitioners, ultrasound technologists, and researchers attend the Annual Congress to discuss the latest technology, treatments and advances from  experts in the field of venous and lymphatic disease.

Dr. Fronek is a past president of the ACP and an active member. She will be speaking about various topics on venous disease.

La Jolla Vein Care Amongst San Diego’s Top Doctors

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La Jolla Vein Care doctors featured in San Diego Magazine’s Top Doctors Issue 2014.

La Jolla Vein Care doctors Nisha Bunke, M.D. and Helane Fronek, M.D. were featured in the October issue of San Diego Magazine’s  Top Doctors issue 2014 for vein specialists. Pick up a copy of San Diego Magazine to read their article. Congratulations to our friend and colleague, Dr.  Kulreet Chaudhary who graced the cover of the Top Doctors issue.

Muscle Hernia or Varicose Veins?

Muscle herniations of the legs frequently are confused with varicose veins. Patients may present with bulging along the outer part of the shin, that looks like a varicose vein. It may or may not be painful. It goes away with flexing the foot (pointing your toes to your head).  But, to experienced vein care specialists, it is clearly a muscle herniation.

A Muscle herniation is a focal protrusion of muscle tissue through a defect in the deep fascial layer. Anterior tibial muscle is the most commonly affected muscle of the lower extremities because its fascia is the most vulnerable to trauma. Clinically it is characterized by asymptomatic or painful, skin-coloured, soft, subcutaneous nodules of various size depending on the position. The diagnosis is usually made clinically based on its typical manifestations, but ultrasonographic examination is useful for detecting the fascial defect and excluding other conditions caused by soft tissue tumours such as lipomas, angiolipomas, fibromas, schwannomas or varicosities.

Usually, surgical treatment is not needed, but may be necessary for increasingly painful hernias.

At La Jolla Vein Care, we frequently see muscle herniations that are confused with varicose veins. Using ultrasound technology and a clinical examination, we can make the accurate diagnosis.