VenaSeal ‘Vein Glue’ Approved By FDA To Treat Varicose Veins

VenaSeal ‘Vein Glue’ Approved By FDA To Treat Varicose Veins

Earlier this week, The U.S. food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the VenaSeal closure system to permanently treat varicose veins by sealing the affected superficial veins using an adhesive agent.

This treatment has been usedvenaseal in Europe, and will soon be available to vein specialists and their patients in the United States.

According to the manufacturer’s website:

‘The VenaSeal Sapheon Closure System is a unique, minimally invasive treatment that uses a safe-for-the-body medical glue to quickly and effectively treat varicose veins (venous reflux disease). Using ultrasound, a doctor will guide a tiny catheter through a small access site in the skin and into the diseased area of the vein. Next, the VenaSeal dispenser delivers a very small amount of medical glue to close the vein. Once the affected vein is closed, blood is immediately re-routed through other healthy veins in the leg.

Unlike other treatments, VenaSeal does not require anaesthesia to be injected into the leg via multiple needle sticks (tumescent anesthesia), and because there are no pre-procedures drugs involved, patients can return to their normal activities right after the treatment. Unlike heat-based procedures, with VenaSeal there is no risk of skin burns or nerve damage. VenaSeal usually does not require any post-treatment pain medication or uncomfortable compression stockings.’

 

 

Dr. Bunke Explains Non-surgical Varicose Vein Treatments on San Diego News

Vein Stripping is a thing of the past! Watch La Jolla Vein Care’s Dr. Bunke on San Diego Living explain alternative non-surgical vein treatments to the outdated vein stripping surgery!  The episode was aired yesterday, February 10th, on CW’s Channel 6. As Dr. Bunke explains, a common misperception about varicose vein treatment is that vein stripping surgery is still used as the main method used to treat varicose veins. The truth is, vein stripping surgery is nearly obsolete, with endovenous ablation being considered as the standard of care for treatment of the great saphenous and small saphenous veins. There are other treatment methods such as ultrasound guided foam sclerotherapy for the branching, bulging veins at the surface of the skin.

This news segment provides animations about how these vein treatments work.

For the endovenous ablation, specifically radiofrequency ablation of varicose veins, also known as the Venefit procedure (previously called VNUS Closure) is described. Dr. Bunke explains that a thin, flexible tubing called a catheter is placed inside the diseased vein. Radiofrequency energy is delivered to h
eat the vein and seal it shut. The body will gradually dissolve the treated vein. The blood is directed through other healthy veins.

A foam sclerotherapy animation is also shown. Foam sclerotherapy involves injecting a foamed medicine into the vein that will cause it to collapse, shrink and eventually dissolve.

These varicose vein procedures are minimally invasive and can be performed in the office without general anesthesia and almost immediate return to normal activities.