Dr. Fronek to Speak at ACP Annual Congress in Phoenix

Dr. Fronek

Dr. Helane Fronek to speak at the ACP Annual Congress in Phoenix.

La Jolla Vein Care’s Dr. Helane Fronek was invited to speak to her peers at the upcoming, American College of Phlebology (ACP) Annual Congress in Phoenix.  This congress is the country’s largest peer-education forum dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of venous and lymphatic disease. Attended by hundreds of vein care specialists, from physicians to nurses to researchers, the Annual Congress is one of the best opportunities to learn directly from experts in the field and connect with other medical professionals in the field of vein care. Each year, approximately 900 vein care specialists from across the globe come together at our Annual Congress. Participants come from all areas of the medical profession–physicians, nurse practitioners, ultrasound technologists, and researchers attend the Annual Congress to discuss the latest technology, treatments and advances from  experts in the field of venous and lymphatic disease.

Dr. Fronek is a past president of the ACP and an active member. She will be speaking about various topics on venous disease.

Dr. Bunke Trains Doctors Using Vein Simulator

Dr. Bunke Paquette instructed doctors on advanced techniques of sclerotherapy last week at a workshop hosted by the Society for Vascular Medicine. Dr. Bunke used a special training model, called a ‘sclerotrainer,’ which allows educators to teach vein injection techniques on a lifelike model that includes veins filled with fluid that is the same viscosity as blood, of varying sizes and depth and veins .  This device made it possible for many clinicians to perfect different injection techniques for tiny telangiectatic and reticular veins.

scleroworkshop

La Jolla Vein Care’s Dr. Bunke Paquette instructs doctors on techniques for sclerotherapy of telangiectasias and reticular veins on a life-like model of veins.

scleroworkshop3

The Sclerotrainer is a lifelike model that includes veins filled with fluid that is the same viscosity as blood, of varying sizes and depth and veins. This allows educators to teach vein injection techniques for the treatment of small spider and reticular veins.

The La Jolla Vein Care staff also helped out with the lesson and shared their expertise with the physicians.

Dr. Bunke Presents at SVM Scientific Sessions

NBSVMMEETING

Dr Nisha Bunke Paquette presents at the SVM Annual Scientific Meeting in La Jolla, Torrey Pines Hilton June, 2014.

La Jolla Vein Care’s Dr. Nisha Bunke presented a talk about the ‘Management of Non-healing wounds in venous disease’ at the Society for Vascular Medicine’s Annual Scientific Sessions this past weekend. She spoke about venous leg ulcers, which she described as being the most common type of chronic leg ulcer, how to make the correct diagnosis and how to heal the venous leg ulcers.

Other topics at the meeting included venous thromboembolism (DVT), diagnosing and treatments for DVT, atypical wounds, phlebectomy, managment of the diabetic wound, duplex evaluation of the lower extremities for DVT, doppler evaluation of the arterial system, lymphedema, lipedema and many other venous, arterial and lymphatic system topics.

History of Foam Sclerotherapy Treatment of Varicose Veins

foam

Foamed sclerosant inside a vein: Once foam is introduced into the vein, it is hyperechogenic on ultrasound. In this picture, a La Jolla Vein Care doctor points to the foamed medication inside the vein. Notice it appears ‘white.’

foam03*

Foamed sclerosant used for sclerotherapy has a ‘foam’ or frothy-like appearance.

In 1994 and 1950, E.J. Orbach introduced the concept of a macro bubble air-block technique to enhance the properties of sclerosant in performing macrosclerotherapy.  Apparently, few vascular surgeons were interested in the subject and the technique languished.  The work of Juan Cabrera and colleagues in Spain attracted attention of some vein specialists and interest in the use of foam technology in treating venous insufficiency was reawakened. Administration of foamed sclerosant was reintroduced in the early 1990s by Cabrerra, who summarized a broad experience in 1997. By the 1990’s, broad use of diagnostic ultrasound imaging made it possible to monitor foam distribution with ultrasound scanning. Some 40 years earlier, and before the development of ultrasound scanning, foam had been used in Germany to treat varicose veins.  At that time, foam was made by special syringes and its distribution was assessed by touch, instead of ultrasound scanning. Tessari , prior to the year 2000 developed an easy way of making liquid sclerosant into foam using two syringes and a three-way stop cock.   By 2000, Sica was able to report a three-year experience using foamed sclerosant in treating saphenous varices.  Since that time, foam has appeared increasingly in general use. Around 2000, Dr. John Bergan began describing the utility and success of foam treatment to physicians in the United States and can be attributed to bringing its awareness to North America. Over the past decade foam has gained world-wide popularity for the treatment of varicose vein tributaries in place of surgery. Varithena foam was recently FDA approved to treat the great saphenous vein with foam sclerotherapy.  Dr. Bergan predicted that microfoam sclerotherapy will eventually replace all other methods.  Presently, it is most commonly used as an adjunct to endovenous ablation of the great and small saphenous veins or as a sole treatment for surface varicose veins.

Dr. Fronek teaches primary care doctors to care for patients with vein problems

Dr. Fronek was recently invited to discuss vein disorders with the Family Medicine Residency Program at Scripps Chula Vista.  The doctors-in-training were excited  to learn about the variety of problems that patients have with their veins – including  spider veins,  varicose veins,  blood clots, and leg ulcers.  Primary care doctors see patients with vein disorders every day, and yet very few medical schools or residency training programs include any information about these common problems.  Dr. Fronek and Dr. Bunke-Pacquette are committed to sharing their expertise with colleagues and are frequently asked to speak at medical meetings.  Primary care doctors, in particular, can often start patients with vein disorders on conservative treatment, including graduated compression stockings and regular exercise (walking is usually the best exercise for vein disorders), as well as certain supplements such as horse chestnut seed extract, that can alleviate the symptoms that many patients with vein disease suffer from.  Informed primary care doctors can also refer patients to a vein specialist when symptoms aren’t diminished with conservative treatment, if the varicose veins worsen while a patient is using compression and exercise, or if the patient suffers from a venous leg ulcer.

Oxford University Press releases The Vein Book

The second edition of The Vein Book, edited by Dr. Nisha Bunke Paquette and Dr. John Bergan will be released on January 30th, 2014 by the Oxford University Press.

Since its initial publication nearly a decade ago, The Vein Book continues to serves as the ultimate comprehensive resource on venous disease. Upholding its reputation as the go-to reference for complete, authoritative, and up-to-date information about venous function and dysfunction, this second edition effectively bridges the gap between clinical medicine and basic science, suitable both for the seasoned surgeon as well as the medical student.

La Jolla Vein Care's Dr. Bunke releases The Vein Book

La Jolla Vein Care’s Dr. Bunke releases The Vein Book

The book is divided into five essential sections: basic considerations, primary superficial venous insufficiency, venous thromboembolism, chronic venous insufficiency, and congenital venous malformations. The book covers the entire spectrum of venous conditions from clarification of the pathophysiology of venous insufficiency, molecular mechanisms in the cause of varicose veins, new treatment options for varicose veins and spider veins, startling new treatment for venous thromboembolic disease, and effective treatment for leg ulcers.

More user-friendly and encyclopedic than ever, The Vein Book is still a must-have for vascular surgeons, phlebologists, interventional radiologists, research scientists, epidemiologists, and surgeons at all levels.  It is available for pre-order at Amazon.com.