Sclerofill Hand Rejuvenation Procedure

The hands can show signs of aging, such as enlarged veins, thinning skin, bony appearance and age spots. Hand veins tend to appear more prominent as one ages due to decreased collagen in the skin. Hand rejuvenation procedures in the past have focused on the removal of hand veins with sclerotherapy. The new concept today is to use an injectable filler

such as Radiesse to stimulate collagen production in the hands to add volume and plump up the skin on the back of the hands, making them appear younger. Radiesse can be used alone to improve the appearance of the hands, or in combination with sclerotherapy of hand veins.

The Sclerofill procedure has been used at La Jolla Vein Care since 2012 for hand rejuvenation. This method combines sclerotherapy of prominent hand veins and the injection of a filler, such as Radiesse to stimulate collagen production. The overall result is more youthful appearing hands.

Watch us on CBS Channel 8 ‘American Health Front’

La Jolla Vein Care’s Dr. Nisha Bunke will be featured on “American Health Front!” this Sunday at 3:00pm on CBS 8. This medical program will follow the PGA tour.  Dr. Bunke talks about vein disorders that afflict Americans and leading edge procedures for treating varicose veins.

Tune in this Sunday, May 17th at 3:00pm on CBS Channel 8, immediately following the final round of the Wells Fargo PGA golf tournament.

 

Video: Spider Vein Sclerotherapy

Watch a video on spider vein treatment with sclerotherapy.

Sclerotherapy is considered the ‘gold standard’ of treatment for leg veins

. Sclerotherapy involves an injection of a medication into the vein.  This will cause the vein to collapse and gradually fade away. Sclerotherapy has been used to treat spider veins for decades, but new solutions such as AscleraTM allow for spider veins to be treated with minimal discomfort and immediate return to activities. Saline solutions are rarely used these days by vein specialists, because alternatives solutions are less painful and better tolerated. Sclerotherapy is preferred by most vein specialists over laser because spider veins often have underlying ‘feeder veins’ that can easily be treated with sclerotherapy, but are not addressed by laser. Many people will require more than one treatment session for optimal results. The national average is 2 to 5 treatment sessions. Wearing compression stockings after treatment will improve results.

What are varicose veins and spider veins?

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Spider veins are like varicose veins but smaller. Often, they are red or blue. They can look like tree branches or spiderwebs with their short, jagged lines. This patient had large clusters bluish colored spider veins around the knee (see top picture). These were treated with sclerotherapy injections at La Jolla Vein Care (after picture on bottom). To see how sclerotherapy works, go to La Jolla Vein Care’s Youtube channel.

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Varicose veins are bulging, twisted veins located just under the skin. This is a before and after picture of a patient who was treated at La Jolla Vein Care with radiofrequency ablation and foam sclerotherapy to dissolve the varicose veins. There are no surgical incisions with these treatments.

Varicose (VAR-i-kos) veins are enlarged veins that can be blue, red, or flesh-colored. They often look like cords and appear twisted and bulging. They can be swollen and raised above the surface of the skin. Varicose veins are often found on the thighs, backs of the calves, or the inside of the leg. During pregnancy, varicose veins can form around the vagina and buttocks.

Spider veins are like varicose veins but smaller. They also are closer to the surface of the skin than varicose veins. Often, they are red or blue. They can look like tree branches or spiderwebs with their short, jagged lines. They can be found on the legs and face and can cover either a very small or very large area of skin.

 

VenaSeal ‘Vein Glue’ Approved By FDA To Treat Varicose Veins

VenaSeal ‘Vein Glue’ Approved By FDA To Treat Varicose Veins

Earlier this week, The U.S. food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the VenaSeal closure system to permanently treat varicose veins by sealing the affected superficial veins using an adhesive agent.

This treatment has been usedvenaseal in Europe, and will soon be available to vein specialists and their patients in the United States.

According to the manufacturer’s website:

‘The VenaSeal Sapheon Closure System is a unique, minimally invasive treatment that uses a safe-for-the-body medical glue to quickly and effectively treat varicose veins (venous reflux disease). Using ultrasound, a doctor will guide a tiny catheter through a small access site in the skin and into the diseased area of the vein. Next, the VenaSeal dispenser delivers a very small amount of medical glue to close the vein. Once the affected vein is closed, blood is immediately re-routed through other healthy veins in the leg.

Unlike other treatments, VenaSeal does not require anaesthesia to be injected into the leg via multiple needle sticks (tumescent anesthesia), and because there are no pre-procedures drugs involved, patients can return to their normal activities right after the treatment. Unlike heat-based procedures, with VenaSeal there is no risk of skin burns or nerve damage. VenaSeal usually does not require any post-treatment pain medication or uncomfortable compression stockings.’