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WORLD THROMBOSIS DAY

WORLD THROMBOSIS DAY

Recognized on 13 October, World Thrombosis Day (WTD) focuses attention on the often overlooked and misunderstood disease of thrombosis. With hundreds of educational events in countries around the world, WTD and its partners place a global spotlight on thrombosis as an urgent and growing health problem.

Thrombosis is the formation of potentially deadly blood clots in the artery (arterial thrombosis) or vein (venous thrombosis). Once formed, a clot can slow or block normal blood flow, and even break loose and travel to an organ. This can result in significant injury, including heart attack, stroke and venous thromboembolism – the top three cardiovascular killers.

At La Jolla Vein Care, we specialize in ultrasound imaging technology that can diagnose blood clots in the leg veins, called deep venous thrombosis or DVT. A new or acute DVT requires emergency care. Old or chronic DVTs can damage the valves in the leg veins, causing a collection of signs and symptoms related to venous disease. We treat these types of conditions at La Jolla Vein Care.  logo-wtd-main

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) – A blood clot that forms in the veins located deep within a limb, usually the lower leg or thigh. By blocking the flow of blood back to the heart, these clots are often characterized by pain and swelling of the leg. Clots in the leg can break off, travel to the lungs and lodge there as pulmonary embolism (PE). These can be fatal because they block the flow of blood from the lungs back into the heart.

learn more about world thrombosis day

To learn about how La Jolla Vein Care can help you, please call or email us @info@lajollaveincare.com

World Thrombosis Day

Venous thrombosis is an extremely important condition, that we take very seriously at La Jolla Vein Care. Since we deal with veins, we frequently diagnose this condition  in our office.  This condition always requires attentions, as consequences can be severe and life-threatening in some cases.  The following about World Thrombosis Day, which is a movement to increase public and professional education about blood clots,  is reprinted from worldthrombosis.org.

World Thrombosis Day (WTD) is one day – October 13 – around the world dedicated to focusing attention on the often overlooked and misunderstood disease burden caused by  thrombosis globally…but it is not a one-time observance.

Thrombosis refers to a blood clot that forms in your artery or vein. It is the one disorder that causes the world’s top three cardiovascular killers: heart attack, stroke and venous thromboembolism (VTE) – a blood clot mostly in the leg or lungs. While most people are aware of heart attack and stroke, fewer people know about VTE. That’s why VTE is our initial focus for WTD. 

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La Jolla Vein Care supports World Thrombosis Day

The World Health Assembly has set a global target of reducing premature deaths from non-infectious disease, including cardiovascular disease, by 25 percent by 2025. To meet this goal, we must reduce thrombosis.

 

Inherited Risk of Deep Venous Thrombosis (DVT)

The Factor V Leiden mutation is one of the most common inherited genetic mutations, causing blood clotting disorders. It is found in 4% to 6% of the U.S. population.

If someone has one copy of this genetic mutation (heterozygous), they are considered a carrier of the mutation.  A carrier has an approximate 3 to 6 fold increased risk of venous thromboembolism.  If a person carries two copies of the genetic mutation (homozygous) their risk of a blood clot is much higher, and many of these patients will be on lifelong blood thinners. This risk is increased when exposed to other risk factors such as pregnancy, oral contraceptives, immobility, and surgery.  If you are Factor V Leiden, the doctor may recommend a blood thinner during varicose vein treatment. It is important to talk with your doctor about your history or family history of blood clotting disorders, to better reduce your risk of a blood clot when undergoing any type of procedure or surgery.

 

Should I Wear Compression When I Travel to Prevent a DVT?

Should I Wear Compression When I Travel to Prevent a DVT?

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Using compression stockings during travel can reduce the risk of developing a flight-related deep venous thrombosis (DVT).

Yes. Compression stockings are great to use during air travel and long trips where you will be sitting for long periods of time. When you sit for long periods of time you are more at risk of blood clots and swelling. Compression stockings can reduce your risks and prevent swelling.  Ask your doctor the strength that is recommended for you.

Dr. Bunke Presents at SVM Scientific Sessions

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Dr Nisha Bunke Paquette presents at the SVM Annual Scientific Meeting in La Jolla, Torrey Pines Hilton June, 2014.

La Jolla Vein Care’s Dr. Nisha Bunke presented a talk about the ‘Management of Non-healing wounds in venous disease’ at the Society for Vascular Medicine’s Annual Scientific Sessions this past weekend. She spoke about venous leg ulcers, which she described as being the most common type of chronic leg ulcer, how to make the correct diagnosis and how to heal the venous leg ulcers.

Other topics at the meeting included venous thromboembolism (DVT), diagnosing and treatments for DVT, atypical wounds, phlebectomy, managment of the diabetic wound, duplex evaluation of the lower extremities for DVT, doppler evaluation of the arterial system, lymphedema, lipedema and many other venous, arterial and lymphatic system topics.

I was told I have a Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), what does that mean?

I was told I have a Deep Vein Thrombosis-DVT, what does that mean?

A deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a blood clot in one of the veins in the deep venous system. There are 2 types of veins in the legs, deep and superficial. Deep veins are deep within the muscle and are responsible for 90% of the blood return from the legs to the lungs and heart. These veins are necessary for life. Superficial veins are in the subcutaneous tissue and are not needed, therefore can be treated. Blood clots occur when the blood thickens and sticks together. A blood clot in the deep veins can break off and travel up through the bloodstream, becoming an embolism. The most serious and immediate concern is a pulmonary embolism, which is when the blood clot travels to an artery in the lungs and blocks blood flow. This can cause damage to the lungs or other organs and can cause death. A blood clot in the thigh is more likely to break off than a clot in the lower legs. A DVT is diagnosed by a venous ultrasound of the leg. A physician will decide if a blood thinner is needed for treatment of the blood clot based on a variety of factors. If a blood clot is suspected, an ultrasound is necessary immediately and a physician should be notified.

Dr. Oz discusses DVT (blood clots in the veins)

Yesterday, the Emmy award-winning television show, Dr. Oz featured information about blood clots in the veins, specifically, deep venous thrombosis (DVT).  He demonstrated how they can break off and travel to the heart and lungs. But, what was missing from this segment was more information about what causes DVT and how can you prevent them.

What are some of the most common causes of DVT?

DVT:  There are many causes of DVT. You can categorize these into three main groups.   (Medically, these 3 risk factors for DVT are collectively called Virchow’s Triad)

A)   Decreased movement of blood (venous stasis),

  1. Decreased movement of blood can be caused by immobilization: sedentary, prolonged sitting, long plane flights or car trips, or post-surgery being inactive, and bed rest like in hospitals or nursing homes. This is where compression is crucial to preventing blood clots since the external compression increases the venous return back to the heart and reduces pooling. Venous insufficiency allows blood to pool.

B)   Increased tendency to clot (hypercoagulability)

  1. Temporary conditions such as pregnancy, cancer and obesity cause the blood to become hypercoagulable. The use of oral contraceptives, estrogens hormone replacement, testosterone, increase the risk of blood clots.
    • The likelihood of a blood clot during pregnancy is 5-20 for every 10,000 women.
    • The likelihood of a blood clot post partum is 40-65 for every 10,000 women.
  2. Genetic conditions that are inherited can increase the risk of blood clots. For example, Factor V Leiden and antiphospholipid antibody. 5% of the population carry one copy of the Factor V Leiden mutation.

C)   Damage to the blood vessel wall

  1. Trauma, injury to the leg, surgery

What can you do to prevent DVT?

Stay moving, avoid prolonged sitting. For example, when flying or traveling, the risk of DVT is 1% on a long haul flight (greater than 6 hours).  To minimize this risk, you should wear compression stockings (which helps increase the blood flow in the legs), stay hydrated, avoid excessive alcohol, use the calf muscles- walk about the cabin and frequently pump the calf muscles by doing foot lifts.

During pregnancy, compression stockings should be worn and after pregnancy, when the risk of DVT is highest (the likelihood of a blood clot post partum is 40-65 for every 10,000 women).

Your doctor can recommend to you what type of compression socks to use.  For more information about compression socks, go to compressrx.com.

Deep Venous Thrombosis Afflicts Serena Williams, Richard Nixon and more….

What do Serena Williams, Richard Nixon, Dan Quayle, Dick Cheney and David Bloom have in common? They have all suffered a potentially fatal deep venous thrombosis (DVT).

Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) mainly affects the large veins in the lower leg and thigh. The clot can block blood flow and cause swelling and pain. When a clot breaks off and moves through the bloodstream, this is called an embolism. An embolism can get stuck in the brain, lungs, heart, or other area, leading to severe damage.

Blood clots may form when something slows or changes the flow of blood in the veins. Risk factors include:

  • After a pacemaker catheter has been passed through the vein in the groin
  • Bedrest
  • Cigarette smoking
  • Family history of blood clots
  • Fractures in the pelvis or legs
  • Giving birth within the last 6 months
  • Heart failure
  • Obesity
  • Recent surgery (especially hip, knee, or female pelvic surgery)
  • Too many blood cells being made by the bone marrow (polycythemia vera), causing the blood to be thicker and slower than normal

You’re also more likely to develop DVT if you have any of the following conditions:

  • Blood that is more likely to clot (hypercoagulability)
  • Cancer
  • Taking estrogens or birth control pills.
  • Long airplane flights: London’s Heathrow Airport reports one passenger death a month from DVT. One nearby hospital recorded thirty passenger deaths from DVT in the past three years including a 28-year-old man. To reduce the risk of DVT during air travel,  passengers are advised to wear compression stockings on flights, frequent moving aroudnt he cabinand pumping the calf muscles, leg elevation and avoidance of sedentary positions for long periods of time without moving.