1, 5, 2021

How Ultrasound Can Detect Hidden Dangers in Leg Veins

2021-05-01T01:06:15-07:00

The Duplex Ultrasound examination allows us to visualize the blood vessels that are not visible to the naked eye, even blood vessels that are deep within the muscles. Ultrasound looks at deep and superficial veins in the legs to check for venous-valvular incompetence (the underlying condition that causes varicose veins). The ultrasound examination is used to both identify the veins that have faulty valves and to map the anatomy of the veins, creating a ‘road map.’ This is necessary to make an accurate assessment of the cause and extent of the varicose veins, as well as to formulate the best treatment plan. This should be done for any individual being evaluated for varicose veins, leg swelling, skin changes, patients who have failed prior treatment, patients who are symptomatic and in some patients with certain anatomic patterns of spider veins.

Before your test:

This study does not require any preparation. You should not wear your compression stockings the same day as the examination. Make sure to be hydrated.

How Ultrasound Can Detect Hidden Dangers in Leg Veins2021-05-01T01:06:15-07:00

2, 7, 2020

What are the adverse effects of vein treatment?

2020-10-23T15:44:39-07:00

Adverse effects of vein treatment are uncommon.

Patients generally do very well with vein treatments, all of which have a low risk of complications. Most patients feel the benefits within a couple of weeks of treatment, for others it may take longer. With all treatments, the benefits need to be discussed along with the potential side effects or adverse events. The following are potential adverse effects from thermal vein ablations we tell our patients.

  • Aching over the treated veins is normal. This responds well to walking, ice packs, and anti-inflammatory medications such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) or naproxen (Aleve).
  • Bruising over injection sites is also normal after vein treatment and resolves in about two weeks.
  • Hyperpigmentation over a vein can occur from blood pigments that are released as the vein is healing. It is more common in patients with large bulging veins and certain complexions. Hyperpigmentation tends to fade over many weeks if you stay out of direct sunlight.
  • Intravascular hematoma refers to a large varicose vein that becomes firm and tender days to weeks after treatment. This also responds well to ice packs and anti-inflammatory medications. We may also recommend a confirmatory ultrasound and/or offer needle drainage of the trapped blood to alleviate discomfort and minimize skin pigmentation.
  • Deep vein clots are very uncommon, and usually are limited to patients with poor mobility, advanced age, hormone treatment, and/or genetic tendency for clotting. We monitor all patients with ultrasound throughout treatment so we can detect clots at a very early stage before they cause a symptom. We may recommend surveillance ultrasounds, extra walking, and/or a short course of blood thinners.
  • Numb spot over a treated vein is another uncommon event after radiofrequency or laser vein ablation. This occurs when a branch of a skin nerve gets stunned during the heat treatment. It tends to improve over several weeks. The nerves that control the movement of the leg and foot are located far from the superficial veins.
What are the adverse effects of vein treatment?2020-10-23T15:44:39-07:00

3, 6, 2020

Blood Vessel Diseases that can be Diagnosed with Duplex Ultrasound

2020-09-18T18:19:53-07:00

Duplex ultrasound combines Doppler flow information and conventional imaging information, sometimes called B-mode, to allow physicians to see the structure of your blood vessels. Duplex ultrasound uses sound waves to get images of your blood vessels. It also helps determine how fast blood moves through the vessels. It can also be useful to estimate the diameter of a blood vessel as well as the amount of obstruction, if any, in the blood vessel. Using duplex ultrasound technology, the structure of your blood vessels, the valve function, the movement of your red blood cells and direction of blood flow through the vessels, and any blockages or blood clots can be seen.

Diseases of the blood vessels can affect both veins and arteries.

Vascular refers to the blood vessels in the body. There are two main types of blood vessels; the arteries and veins. Arteries bring oxygen-rich blood from the heart to every inch of the body; vein return the blood back to the heart and lungs for more oxygen. Vascular disease is when the blood vessels are no longer healthy.

Common types of vein disease include:

  • Varicose veins
  • Chronic venous insufficiency
  • Deep venous thrombosis

Common types of artery disease includes:

  • Carotid artery disease and stroke (TIA or Stroke)*
  • Lower extremity arterial disease (PAD)**
  • Upper extremity arterial disease
  • Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)
Blood Vessel Diseases that can be Diagnosed with Duplex Ultrasound2020-09-18T18:19:53-07:00

23, 10, 2015

WORLD THROMBOSIS DAY

2021-11-03T23:42:59-07:00

WORLD THROMBOSIS DAY

Recognized on 13 October, World Thrombosis Day (WTD) focuses attention on the often overlooked and misunderstood disease of thrombosis. With hundreds of educational events in countries around the world, WTD and its partners place a global spotlight on thrombosis as an urgent and growing health problem.

Thrombosis is the formation of potentially deadly blood clots in the artery (arterial thrombosis) or vein (venous thrombosis). Once formed, a clot can slow or block normal blood flow, and even break loose and travel to an organ. This can result in significant injury, including heart attack, stroke and venous thromboembolism – the top three cardiovascular killers.

At La Jolla Vein Care, we specialize in ultrasound imaging technology that can diagnose blood clots in the leg veins, called deep venous thrombosis or DVT. A new or acute DVT requires emergency care. Old or chronic DVTs can damage the valves in the leg veins, causing a collection of signs and symptoms related to venous disease. We treat these types of conditions at La Jolla Vein Care.  logo-wtd-main

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) – A blood clot that forms in the veins located deep within a limb, usually the lower leg or thigh. By blocking the flow of blood back to the heart, these clots are often characterized by pain and swelling of the leg. Clots in the leg can break off, travel to the lungs and lodge there as pulmonary embolism (PE). These can be fatal because they block the flow of blood from the lungs back into the heart.

learn more about world thrombosis day

To learn about how La Jolla Vein Care can help you, please call or email us @info@lajollaveincare.com

WORLD THROMBOSIS DAY2021-11-03T23:42:59-07:00

14, 10, 2014

World Thrombosis Day

2014-10-14T16:49:44-07:00

Venous thrombosis is an extremely important condition, that we take very seriously at La Jolla Vein Care. Since we deal with veins, we frequently diagnose this condition  in our office.  This condition always requires attentions, as consequences can be severe and life-threatening in some cases.  The following about World Thrombosis Day, which is a movement to increase public and professional education about blood clots,  is reprinted from worldthrombosis.org.

World Thrombosis Day (WTD) is one day – October 13 – around the world dedicated to focusing attention on the often overlooked and misunderstood disease burden caused by  thrombosis globally…but it is not a one-time observance.

Thrombosis refers to a blood clot that forms in your artery or vein. It is the one disorder that causes the world’s top three cardiovascular killers: heart attack, stroke and venous thromboembolism (VTE) – a blood clot mostly in the leg or lungs. While most people are aware of heart attack and stroke, fewer people know about VTE. That’s why VTE is our initial focus for WTD. 

logo

La Jolla Vein Care supports World Thrombosis Day

The World Health Assembly has set a global target of reducing premature deaths from non-infectious disease, including cardiovascular disease, by 25 percent by 2025. To meet this goal, we must reduce thrombosis.

 

World Thrombosis Day2014-10-14T16:49:44-07:00

Inherited Risk of Deep Venous Thrombosis (DVT)

2014-10-07T16:16:43-07:00

The Factor V Leiden mutation is one of the most common inherited genetic mutations, causing blood clotting disorders. It is found in 4% to 6% of the U.S. population.

If someone has one copy of this genetic mutation (heterozygous), they are considered a carrier of the mutation.  A carrier has an approximate 3 to 6 fold increased risk of venous thromboembolism.  If a person carries two copies of the genetic mutation (homozygous) their risk of a blood clot is much higher, and many of these patients will be on lifelong blood thinners. This risk is increased when exposed to other risk factors such as pregnancy, oral contraceptives, immobility, and surgery.  If you are Factor V Leiden, the doctor may recommend a blood thinner during varicose vein treatment. It is important to talk with your doctor about your history or family history of blood clotting disorders, to better reduce your risk of a blood clot when undergoing any type of procedure or surgery.

 

Inherited Risk of Deep Venous Thrombosis (DVT)2014-10-07T16:16:43-07:00

30, 7, 2014

Should I Wear Compression When I Travel to Prevent a DVT?

2021-11-05T13:04:03-07:00

Should I Wear Compression When I Travel to Prevent a DVT?

travel

Using compression stockings during travel can reduce the risk of developing a flight-related deep venous thrombosis (DVT).

Yes. Compression stockings are great to use during air travel and long trips where you will be sitting for long periods of time. When you sit for long periods of time you are more at risk of blood clots and swelling. Compression stockings can reduce your risks and prevent swelling.  Ask your doctor the strength that is recommended for you.

Should I Wear Compression When I Travel to Prevent a DVT?2021-11-05T13:04:03-07:00

18, 6, 2014

Dr. Bunke Presents at SVM Scientific Sessions

2021-11-05T11:10:02-07:00

NBSVMMEETING

Dr Nisha Bunke Paquette presents at the SVM Annual Scientific Meeting in La Jolla, Torrey Pines Hilton June 2014.

La Jolla Vein Care’s Dr. Nisha Bunke presented a talk about the ‘Management of Non-healing wounds in venous disease’ at the Society for Vascular Medicine’s Annual Scientific Sessions this past weekend. She spoke about venous leg ulcers, which she described as being the most common type of chronic leg ulcer, how to make the correct diagnosis and how to heal the venous leg ulcers.

Other topics at the meeting included venous thromboembolism (DVT), diagnosing and treatments for DVT, atypical wounds, phlebectomy, management of the diabetic wound, duplex evaluation of the lower extremities for DVT, doppler evaluation of the arterial system, lymphedema, lipedema, and many other venous, arterial and lymphatic system topics.

Dr. Bunke Presents at SVM Scientific Sessions2021-11-05T11:10:02-07:00

29, 5, 2014

I was told I have a Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), what does that mean?

2014-05-29T00:16:01-07:00

I was told I have a Deep Vein Thrombosis-DVT, what does that mean?

A deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a blood clot in one of the veins in the deep venous system. There are 2 types of veins in the legs, deep and superficial. Deep veins are deep within the muscle and are responsible for 90% of the blood return from the legs to the lungs and heart. These veins are necessary for life. Superficial veins are in the subcutaneous tissue and are not needed, therefore can be treated. Blood clots occur when the blood thickens and sticks together. A blood clot in the deep veins can break off and travel up through the bloodstream, becoming an embolism. The most serious and immediate concern is a pulmonary embolism, which is when the blood clot travels to an artery in the lungs and blocks blood flow. This can cause damage to the lungs or other organs and can cause death. A blood clot in the thigh is more likely to break off than a clot in the lower legs. A DVT is diagnosed by a venous ultrasound of the leg. A physician will decide if a blood thinner is needed for treatment of the blood clot based on a variety of factors. If a blood clot is suspected, an ultrasound is necessary immediately and a physician should be notified.

I was told I have a Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT), what does that mean?2014-05-29T00:16:01-07:00

1, 11, 2013

Dr. Oz discusses DVT (blood clots in the veins)

2013-11-01T15:22:46-07:00

Yesterday, the Emmy award-winning television show, Dr. Oz featured information about blood clots in the veins, specifically, deep venous thrombosis (DVT).  He demonstrated how they can break off and travel to the heart and lungs. But, what was missing from this segment was more information about what causes DVT and how can you prevent them.

What are some of the most common causes of DVT?

DVT:  There are many causes of DVT. You can categorize these into three main groups.   (Medically, these 3 risk factors for DVT are collectively called Virchow’s Triad)

A)   Decreased movement of blood (venous stasis),

  1. Decreased movement of blood can be caused by immobilization: sedentary, prolonged sitting, long plane flights or car trips, or post-surgery being inactive, and bed rest like in hospitals or nursing homes. This is where compression is crucial to preventing blood clots since the external compression increases the venous return back to the heart and reduces pooling. Venous insufficiency allows blood to pool.

B)   Increased tendency to clot (hypercoagulability)

  1. Temporary conditions such as pregnancy, cancer and obesity cause the blood to become hypercoagulable. The use of oral contraceptives, estrogens hormone replacement, testosterone, increase the risk of blood clots.
    • The likelihood of a blood clot during pregnancy is 5-20 for every 10,000 women.
    • The likelihood of a blood clot post partum is 40-65 for every 10,000 women.
  2. Genetic conditions that are inherited can increase the risk of blood clots. For example, Factor V Leiden and antiphospholipid antibody. 5% of the population carry one copy of the Factor V Leiden mutation.

C)   Damage to the blood vessel wall

  1. Trauma, injury to the leg, surgery

What can you do to prevent DVT?

Stay moving, avoid prolonged sitting. For example, when flying or traveling, the risk of DVT is 1% on a long haul flight (greater than 6 hours).  To minimize this risk, you should wear compression stockings (which helps increase the blood flow in the legs), stay hydrated, avoid excessive alcohol, use the calf muscles- walk about the cabin and frequently pump the calf muscles by doing foot lifts.

During pregnancy, compression stockings should be worn and after pregnancy, when the risk of DVT is highest (the likelihood of a blood clot post partum is 40-65 for every 10,000 women).

Your doctor can recommend to you what type of compression socks to use.  For more information about compression socks, go to compressrx.com.

Dr. Oz discusses DVT (blood clots in the veins)2013-11-01T15:22:46-07:00
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