vasculardisease

25, 11, 2022

What you need to know about abdominal aortic aneurysm

2022-10-24T14:50:55-07:00

What is an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)?

The aorta, the largest artery in your body, runs from your heart, down through your chest, and into your abdomen. The abdominal region of the aorta is responsible for delivering blood to your legs, GI tract and kidneys.

An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when the wall of the aorta progressively weakens and begins to bulge. An AAA may continue to enlarge and eventually rupture if left untreated, causing severe internal bleeding and possibly death. Nearly 200,000 people in the United States are diagnosed with A A A annually; approximately 15,000 die each year from a ruptured AAA.

In addition to concerns about rupture, clots or debris may also develop within an AAA. These substances can be carried to other areas in the body and block circulation, causing severe pain or possibly limb loss if blood flow is cut off for too long.

AAA can be safely treated with early diagnosis; however, most patients have no symptoms.

Causes and Risk Factors:

Most aortic aneurysms are caused by a breakdown in the proteins that provide structural strength to the wall of the aorta. Some risk factors that contribute to this structural breakdown include:

  • Age—individuals over 60 years are most likely to develop the condition
  • Gender—males are more prone to the condition than females
  • History of atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) • Family history of AAA
  • Smoking
  • High blood pressure

Symptoms:

Most people feel no symptoms, and an abdominal aortic aneurysm is often detected when tests are conducted for other unrelated reasons. Those who do have symptoms commonly describe back pain, pulsations in the abdomen, groin pain or sometimes sores on the feet.

Diagnosis

If an abdominal aortic aneurysm is suspected, you likely will be referred for an abdominal ultrasound, a painless, safe test that can screen for and measure the size of an AAA. Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) can assess aneurysm size, location and the extent of impact. This study requires exposure to radiation and injection of an intravenous contrast agent. However, a CTA provides valuable anatomic information and can help your vascular surgeon determine the optimal type of repair.

Medicare Screening Benefit

Medicare offers a free, one-time AAA ultrasound screening for qualified seniors as part of their Welcome to Medicare physical during the first 12 months of their enrollment. Men who have smoked sometime during their life and men and women with a family history of AAA are eligible for this benefit.

Treatment

Vascular surgeons can determine the best procedure for you, based on the size of your aneurysm and other factors. For smaller AAAs, you may need to make lifestyle changes, such as quitting smoking and lowering blood pressure. You may be prescribed medication. Your surgeon will have you come back for regular checkups to see if the AAA has changed.

For large AAAs, or those that have been increasing in size over time, repair may be carried out either by placement of an endovascular stent graft or by open bypass grafting.

Be sure to see a board certified vascular surgeon. They have specific training in both minimally invasive and traditional open repairs. The type of repair conducted is very important to long term durability and freedom from rupture.

La Jolla Vein & Vascular runs  the diagnostic ultrasound for AAA, but will refer out for treatment.

La Jolla Vein & Vascular (formerly La Jolla Vein Care) is committed to bringing experts together for unparalleled vein and vascular care. 

Nisha Bunke, MD, Sarah Lucas, MD, and Elliot DeYoung, MD are specialists who combine their experience and expertise to offer world-class vascular care. 

Our accredited center is also a nationally known teaching site and center of excellence. 

For more information on treatments and to book a consultation, please give our office a call at 858-550-0330. 

For a deeper dive into vein and vascular care, please check out our Youtube Channel at this link.

For more information on varicose veins and eliminating underlying venous insufficiency, check this link out full of resources. 

What you need to know about abdominal aortic aneurysm2022-10-24T14:50:55-07:00

31, 10, 2022

What you need to know about Asclera

2022-09-19T20:24:13-07:00

What is polidocanol (Asclera)? 

 

A variety of sclerosant medications can be used for veins, but at La Jolla Vein Care, we prefer polidocanol (brand name Asclera), because it is the most comfortable for the patient and has the lowest risk of side effects. It is a detergent-type medication that injures the inner lining of the veins. This causes the vein to stop flowing, then eventually close down completely. Polidocanol has been well-studied and has been approved by the FDA since 2010 for the treatment of varicose veins and has been used in Europe for decades. Polidocanol is turned into a foam to treat larger veins. This is an off-label use of the sclerosant but very effective and well tolerated. Asclera (polidocanol) Injection is a prescription medicine that is used in a procedure called sclerotherapy to remove unwanted veins on your legs. It is administered by a healthcare provider to treat two types of veins:

 

  • Uncomplicated spider veins (very small varicose veins ≤ 1 mm in diameter)
  • Uncomplicated small varicose veins (1 to 3 mm in diameter) known as reticular veins

Asclera has not been studied in varicose veins more than 3 mm in diameter. La Jolla Vein Care providers have extensive experience with foam sclerotherapy. 

 

ADVERSE REACTIONS: 

 

  • injection site hematoma
  • injection site irritation 
  • injection site discoloration 
  • injection site pain 
  • injection site itching 
  • injection site warmth 
  • neovascularization 
  • injection site clotting

 

How often do I need treatment to see results?

The number and frequency of treatments depends on the size of the vessels and their location. Ask your provider about an individualized treatment approach that is right for you.

How does Asclera work?

Asclera is a sclerosing agent that is injected into the vein. It works by damaging the endothelium, the inside lining of blood vessels. This causes blood platelets and cellular debris to attach to the lining of the vessels. Eventually, cellular debris and platelets cause the blood vessel to clot. Over time, the clotted vein will be replaced with tissue.

How satisfied are patients who use Asclera?

88% of clinical study patients were satisfied or very satisfied with their Asclera treatment after 12 weeks.

How long is each Asclera session?

A typical session lasts 15 to 45 minutes. Generally, 1 to 3 injections may be necessary to treat a given spider or reticular vein. Repeat treatment sessions may be necessary. Any additional treatment sessions are usually separated by 1 to 2 weeks.

What should I expect after being treated with Asclera?

Following treatment, you’ll need to wear compression stockings day and night for 2 to 3 days, then for 2 to 3 weeks during the daytime, as directed by your provider. Compression stockings are designed to apply pressure to your lower legs, helping to maintain blood flow, and reduce discomfort and swelling. Compression helps your legs heal and is necessary to reduce the risk of deep vein thrombosis.

 

Are there activities I should avoid after receiving an Asclera Injection?

For 2 to 3 days following the treatment, avoid:

  • Heavy exercise
  • Sunbathing
  • Long plane flights
  • Hot baths, hot tubs, or saunas

Possible side effects to Asclera treatments:

Temporary side effects may occur at the site of the injection, including:

  • Bruising
  • Raised red areas
  • Small skin sores
  • Darkened skin in the form of lines or spots
  • Multiple tiny red blood vessels

These side effects usually go away within a few days to several weeks. Some side effects may take months or years to resolve.

“Bringing Experts Together for Unparalleled Vein and Vascular Care”

 

La Jolla Vein & Vascular (formerly La Jolla Vein Care) is committed to bringing experts together for unparalleled vein and vascular care. 

 

Nisha Bunke, MD, Sarah Lucas, MD, and Elliot DeYoung, MD are specialists who combine their experience and expertise to offer world-class vascular care. 

 

Our accredited center is also a nationally known teaching site and center of excellence. 

 

For more information on treatments and to book a consultation, please give our office a call at 858-550-0330. 

 

For a deeper dive into vein and vascular care, please check out our Youtube Channel at this link.

 

For more information on varicose veins and eliminating underlying venous insufficiency, check this link out full of resources. 

 

What you need to know about Asclera2022-09-19T20:24:13-07:00

Venous insufficiency and leg ulcers

2022-09-19T19:22:14-07:00

Chronic venous insufficiency and leg ulcers

 

What is chronic venous insufficiency?

Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) is an inflammatory condition caused by long standing, untreated venous reflux disease.  Commonly, venous reflux disease causes a collection of symptoms such as leg swelling, heaviness, fatigue and varicose veins. But, over time, when blood is no longer circulating properly in the leg veins, skin changes can also appear. When skin changes appear, this is termed, chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). Venous stasis is another term used for this condition.   Chronic inflammation from CVI causes the skin around the ankles to darken, become dry, itchy, and firm. In severe cases, the skin can start to break down and ulcerate. The ulcer (wound) occurs in the inner or outer ankle and is also referred to as a stasis ulcer or venous ulcer.

Venous stasis skin changes associated with venous insufficiency include:

  • Darkening of the skin along the ankles
  • Itching and dry skin around the ankles (venous eczema)
  • Development of wounds around the ankles, called venous leg ulcers

HOW IS CVI TREATED?

The treatment of CVI cannot reverse the skin changes but it can prevent it from worsening and ulceration. In our experience, treatment of underlying venous reflux reduces the inflammatory changes and the skin may become less itchy and dry, but the permanent skin discoloration does not disappear. Treatment involves correction of the underlying venous reflux.

HOW ARE LEG ULCERS TREATED?

Venous leg ulcers, depending on the severity, can be healed with a combination of correction of the underlying venous reflux, wound care clinic referral, and compression therapy. A detailed ultrasound will determine what specific treatment is needed depending on where the underlying reflux lies (for example, in the saphenous veins, perforator veins and tributaries). Deep vein reflux is also present in many individuals with ulcers.

 

“Bringing Experts Together for Unparalleled Vein and Vascular Care”

 

La Jolla Vein & Vascular (formerly La Jolla Vein Care) is committed to bringing experts together for unparalleled vein and vascular care. 

 

Nisha Bunke, MD, Sarah Lucas, MD, and Elliot DeYoung, MD are specialists who combine their experience and expertise to offer world-class vascular care. 

 

Our accredited center is also a nationally known teaching site and center of excellence. 

 

For more information on treatments and to book a consultation, please give our office a call at 858-550-0330. 

 

For a deeper dive into vein and vascular care, please check out our Youtube Channel at this link.

 

For more information on varicose veins and eliminating underlying venous insufficiency, check this link out full of resources. 

 

Venous insufficiency and leg ulcers2022-09-19T19:22:14-07:00

What is VenaSeal?

2022-09-19T19:15:25-07:00

What is VenaSeal?

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the VenaSeal Closure System to permanently treat varicose veins by sealing the affected superficial veins using an adhesive agent.

The VenaSeal Closure System is a unique, minimally invasive treatment that uses a safe-for-the-body medical glue to quickly and effectively treat varicose veins (venous reflux disease). Using ultrasound, a doctor will guide a tiny catheter through a small access site in the skin and into the diseased area of the vein. Next, the VenaSeal dispenser delivers a very small amount of medical glue to close the vein. Once the affected vein is closed, blood is immediately re-routed through other healthy veins in the leg.

Unlike other treatments, VenaSeal does not require anesthesia to be injected into the leg via multiple needle sticks (tumescent anesthesia), and because there are no pre-procedures drugs involved, patients can return to their normal activities right after the treatment. Unlike heat-based procedures, with VenaSeal there is no risk of skin burns or nerve damage. VenaSeal usually does not require any post-treatment pain medication or uncomfortable compression stockings.

The VenaSeal closure system is the only non-tumescent, non-thermal, non-sclerosant procedure that uses a proprietary medical adhesive delivered endovenously to close the vein. This unique approach eliminates the risk of nerve injury when treating the small saphenous vein, which is a risk sometimes associated with certain thermal-based procedures. Clinical studies have demonstrated that the procedure is safe and effective.

“Bringing Experts Together for Unparalleled Vein and Vascular Care”

 

La Jolla Vein & Vascular (formerly La Jolla Vein Care) is committed to bringing experts together for unparalleled vein and vascular care. 

 

Nisha Bunke, MD, Sarah Lucas, MD, and Elliot DeYoung, MD are specialists who combine their experience and expertise to offer world-class vascular care. 

 

Our accredited center is also a nationally known teaching site and center of excellence. 

 

For more information on treatments and to book a consultation, please give our office a call at 858-550-0330. 

 

For a deeper dive into vein and vascular care, please check out our Youtube Channel at this link.

 

For more information on varicose veins and eliminating underlying venous insufficiency, check this link out full of resources. 

 

 



What is VenaSeal?2022-09-19T19:15:25-07:00

What you need to know about Varithena

2022-09-19T18:19:50-07:00

WHAT IS VARITHENA?

 

Foam Sclerotherapy

Varithena is a “microfoam” formulation of polidocanol (sclerosing agent) and CO2. The result is a microfoam that has an appearance and consistency similar to white, foamy shave cream. Ultrasound guidance is used to inject Varithena® microfoam into the vein. The microfoam fills the lumen for circumferential contact where it’s designed to displace blood and destroy the endothelial lining efficiently.

Varithena (polidocanol injectable foam)

is a prescription medication used to treat the great saphenous vein system (GSV) and associated varicose veins of the GSV system. Varithena® improves the symptoms of superficial venous incompetence and the appearance of visible varicosities. It is a non-thermal, non-tumescent, nearly painless method of vein treatment. Varithena® may be recommended based on your vein location, size, anatomy and vein tortuosity.

Varithena® is:

  • Effective to treat veins of different sizes above and below the knee
  • Requires no incisions, sedation or general anesthesia
  • Does not require a wire to be inserted along the length of your vein
  • Does not use heat, eliminating the risk of thermal injury

How many treatments will I need?

The number and frequency of treatments depends on a patient’s anatomy, how quickly the veins respond, and the patient’s treatment goals.  There is a limit on the amount of medication we can give you each day to avoid causing side effects.  Some larger or resistant veins may require two treatments to respond completely but most veins respond to Varithena® after one treatment.

 

What should I expect on the day of treatment?

You will sign your consent form then change into shorts provided by the office.  We will clean your skin with alcohol, then use ultrasound to localize the veins.  The foam medication will then be injected into your veins with a fine needle.  The foam fills and treats the desired section of the vein.  The diseased vein collapses and the foam is deactivated.  Your legs will be elevated on a comfortable wedge pillow for approximately 15 minutes. After your treatment, we will help you into your compression stockings, then you will walk for 30 minutes prior to getting in your car.

“Bringing Experts Together for Unparalleled Vein and Vascular Care”

 

La Jolla Vein & Vascular (formerly La Jolla Vein Care) is committed to bringing experts together for unparalleled vein and vascular care. 

 

Nisha Bunke, MD, Sarah Lucas, MD, and Elliot DeYoung, MD are specialists who combine their experience and expertise to offer world-class vascular care. 

 

Our accredited center is also a nationally known teaching site and center of excellence. 

 

For more information on treatments and to book a consultation, please give our office a call at 858-550-0330. 

 

For a deeper dive into vein and vascular care, please check out our Youtube Channel at this link.

 

For more information on varicose veins and eliminating underlying venous insufficiency, check this link out full of resources. 

 

 



What you need to know about Varithena2022-09-19T18:19:50-07:00

Spider Veins before and after patient transformation

2022-09-19T18:09:07-07:00

What are spider veins?

Spider veins are the fine, thread-like reddish veins at the surface of the skin. These veins are not healthy. Veins are often considered a cosmetic issue, but they can be associated with underlying feeder veins, not visible to the naked eye.  Feeder veins are the ‘blue veins’ also known as ‘reticular veins,’ that give rise to spider veins. Spider veins may also be a sign of underlying venous insufficiency. For example, spider veins located in the inner ankles and inner thighs can indicate an underlying problem with the saphenous vein. As a result, an ultrasound examination may be recommended to identify and effectively treat the underlying source of these veins.

What are the symptoms?

Vein conditions affect people differently. For some, these veins can be a painless cosmetic concern, and for others they may cause symptoms. The most common symptoms of spider veins are burning, throbbing, and localized pain. They can also feel hot and itchy and bleed.

What causes them?

Spider veins in the legs are caused by the same condition that causes varicose veins. Leaky vein valves allow blood to pool within the veins causing them to stretch and become enlarged. These veins on other areas of the body, such as the face, and chest can be caused by sun damage, hormone changes or liver disease. Hormones, such as with pregnancy, birth control or hormone replacement therapy can weaken the vein wall.

Below you can see the transformation of 3 of our patients who received vein treatment.

spider veinsspiderspider

 

 

“Bringing Experts Together for Unparalleled Vein and Vascular Care”

 

La Jolla Vein & Vascular (formerly La Jolla Vein Care) is committed to bringing experts together for unparalleled vein and vascular care. 

 

Nisha Bunke, MD, Sarah Lucas, MD, and Elliot DeYoung, MD are specialists who combine their experience and expertise to offer world-class vascular care. 

 

Our accredited center is also a nationally known teaching site and center of excellence. 

 

For more information on treatments and to book a consultation, please give our office a call at 858-550-0330. 

 

For a deeper dive into vein and vascular care, please check out our Youtube Channel at this link.

 

For more information on varicose veins and eliminating underlying venous insufficiency, check this link out full of resources. 

 

Spider Veins before and after patient transformation2022-09-19T18:09:07-07:00

La Jolla Vein & Vascular: Venous Reflux Disease

2022-09-19T17:59:18-07:00

When you become a patient with La Jolla Vein Care, you will go through a screening process, and a vascular evaluation using ultrasound technology to diagnose your venous reflux disease.  

 

Chronic venous insufficiency is a disease affecting at least 50 million Americans. It is very common, but unfortunately undiagnosed. 

 

The anatomy and process of venous insufficiency: 

 

One of the major veins that takes the blood to the heart is deep inside the muscles of the thigh and calf called the deep veins. Parallel to this lies the superficial veins inside the legs. Superficial veins dump the blood into the deep vein in the groin area and collectively they take the blood back to the heart. 

The direction of the blood flow begins from the ground up towards the heart. Both deep and superficial have a structure system known as the valves. They function as a safety unit directional valve system. Where the blood can flow upward and not downward and be open or closed off. Similarly the same type of structure is found in your heart with heart valves. 

 

Over the course of the years, depending on your occupation, family history, pregnancy, surgeries, any trauma or injury to your legs, and any kind of underlying muscular or skeletal problem will contribute to problems with the valves in your legs. The valves, over the course of the years may get farther apart from one another. They will still be able to open and close, but the main problem will be the blood flow will not be able to go in one direction. This causes the veins to become enlarged. As a result,  the valves remain open and the blood to flow upward and also downward. This is known as venous reflux disease. 

 

A consultation with one of our vein specialists involves taking a detailed history and physical examination in combination with a venous reflux ultrasound study.  Based on your personal findings, a customized treatment plan will be discussed which may include doing nothing, conservative management, or various treatment options based on your individual needs. 

 

“Bringing Experts Together for Unparalleled Vein and Vascular Care”

 

La Jolla Vein & Vascular (formerly La Jolla Vein Care) is committed to bringing experts together for unparalleled vein and vascular care. 

 

Nisha Bunke, MD, Sarah Lucas, MD, and Elliot DeYoung, MD are specialists who combine their experience and expertise to offer world-class vascular care. 

 

Our accredited center is also a nationally known teaching site and center of excellence. 

 

For more information on treatments and to book a consultation, please give our office a call at 858-550-0330. 

 

For a deeper dive into vein and vascular care, please check out our Youtube Channel at this link.

 

For more information on varicose veins and eliminating underlying venous insufficiency, check this link out full of resources. 

 

La Jolla Vein & Vascular: Venous Reflux Disease2022-09-19T17:59:18-07:00

La Jolla Vein & Vascular: Duplex Ultrasound

2022-09-19T16:00:31-07:00

The Duplex Ultrasound examination allows us to visualize the blood vessels that are not visible to the naked eye, even blood vessels that are deep within the muscles.  Ultrasound looks at deep and superficial veins in the legs to check for venous-valvular incompetence (the underlying condition that causes varicose veins). The ultrasound examination is used to both identify the veins that have faulty valves and to map the anatomy of the veins, creating a ‘road map.’  This is necessary to make an accurate assessment of the cause and extent of the varicose veins, as well as to formulate the best treatment plan.  This should be done for any individual being evaluated for varicose veins, leg swelling, skin changes, patients who have failed prior treatment, patients who are symptomatic and in some patients with certain anatomic patterns of spider veins.

Before your test:  

This study does not require any preparation. You should not wear your compression stockings the same day as the examination.  Make sure to be hydrated.

 

Who Performs the test?

The ultrasound examination is performed by a Registered Vascular Technologist (RVT). An RVT is a sonographer who completed a two-year ultrasound program, plus additional clinical training and obtained certification by meeting the highest standards by The American Registry for Diagnostic Medical Sonography® (ARDMS®).  It is important that a specially trained RVT perform the study, because over 40 special images are required to meet accreditation standards. All images are reviewed with the physician.

 

How long does the ultrasound study take?

Approximately 45 minutes to an hour.

Is it invasive?

No, the duplex ultrasound a painless and safe study using sound waves to visualize the veins of the leg.

How to prepare?

The duplex ultrasound does not require any preparation. You should not wear your compression stockings the same day as the examination.  Make sure to be hydrated.

“Bringing Experts Together for Unparalleled Vein and Vascular Care”

 

La Jolla Vein & Vascular (formerly La Jolla Vein Care) is committed to bringing experts together for unparalleled vein and vascular care. 

 

Nisha Bunke, MD, Sarah Lucas, MD, and Elliot DeYoung, MD are specialists who combine their experience and expertise to offer world-class vascular care. 

 

Our accredited center is also a nationally known teaching site and center of excellence. 

 

For more information on treatments and to book a consultation, please give our office a call at 858-550-0330. 

 

For a deeper dive into vein and vascular care, please check out our Youtube Channel at this link.

 

For more information on varicose veins and eliminating underlying venous insufficiency, check this link out full of resources. 

 

La Jolla Vein & Vascular: Duplex Ultrasound2022-09-19T16:00:31-07:00

How does diabetes relate to vascular health?

2022-09-19T15:50:54-07:00

Diabetes and Vascular Disease

Diabetes Mellitus is a disease that affects the body’s ability to absorb glucose, which is a form of sugar and a major source of energy. There are two types of diabetes, Type 1 (formerly known as juvenile diabetes) and Type 2 (formerly called adult onset diabetes).

Both cause high levels of glucose in the bloodstream. High blood sugar causes many of the long-term effects of diabetes. Too much sugar in the blood damages the linings of the arteries of all sizes, and that can cause atherosclerosis, in which arteries are weakened and/or clogged with plaque.

Atherosclerosis in diabetic patients can lead to:

  • Kidney damage. Kidneys have tiny blood vessels that remove waste from the blood, but diabetes blocks these blood vessels. As the disease progresses, the kidneys lose function and eventually fail.
  • Retinopathy. High blood sugar can cause tiny blood vessels in the eyes to become blocked. When your eye tries to grow new blood vessels, they grow abnormally, eventually leading to blindness.
  • Peripheral artery disease. Glucose damage to the arteries that feed oxygen and nutrients to the legs and feet can lead to pain in the legs, foot sores that won’t heal, chronic pain from poor circulation and in some cases, amputation.
  • Neuropathy. In this condition, the patient loses feeling in the feet and toes. Decreased blood flow caused by clogged arteries can damage the nerves in the extremities.

If you or someone in your family has diabetes, be aware that:

-Patients with diabetes are more likely to get vascular disease.

-Patients with both diabetes and vascular disease are at risk of amputation, blindness, kidney failure and other serious disabilities.

Treatment of diabetes:

Because of the effects, it is very important to aggressively treat both types of diabetes to minimize long-term damage. Careful maintenance of the blood glucose level is the primary goal of this treatment. The HbAl c is a test that estimates the averaged glucose level over a three-month period. Maintaining an HbAl c < 7% is known to lower the risk of amputation, heart attacks, stroke and onset of peripheral arterial disease.

 

Avoiding foods and snacks high in sugar (which can include seemingly innocuous items such as white bread and pasta) can help maintain healthy glucose control. In addition, exercise helps to burn energy and improve your body’s ability to keep your glucose at a healthy level.

Ultimately, medication is often required to maintain this control. For type 2 diabetes, it has been shown that use of an insulin sensitizing medication (usually an oral agent) dramatically decreases cardiovascular complications compared to using only insulin. Consultation with a diabetes specialist can help you to manage your diabetes optimally. There are many new ways to check your glucose at home, including phone apps, and this knowledge and feedback can help you to manage your A1c better.

 

Preventive Care

Preventive care is a critical component of limiting lifetime complications for diabetics. Diabetes predisposes one to heart attacks, strokes, kidney failure and peripheral arterial disease. Knowing the signs and symptoms of these can facilitate you seeking help before a tragic event occurs. However, diabetes can also blunt the usual nerve response to diseases such as the pain of peripheral artery disease. This loss of sensation results in an increased risk of pressure ulcers on the feet. Patients with diabetes should perform routine inspection of their feet to evaluate for any breaks in the skin and notify their doctor immediately if found.Often, nail care can be complicated in diabetic patients. If you have been told you have peripheral neuropathy, ask for a referral to a podiatrist to assist you with nail care to avoid potentially dangerous injuries in nail care. If you do develop any wounds on your feet that do not heal in a reasonable time or seem to be expanding, ask your doctor to refer you to a vascular surgeon here at La Jolla Vein Care.

“Bringing Experts Together for Unparalleled Vein and Vascular Care”

 

La Jolla Vein & Vascular (formerly La Jolla Vein Care) is committed to bringing experts together for unparalleled vein and vascular care. 

 

Nisha Bunke, MD, Sarah Lucas, MD, and Elliot DeYoung, MD are specialists who combine their experience and expertise to offer world-class vascular care. 

 

Our accredited center is also a nationally known teaching site and center of excellence. 

 

For more information on treatments and to book a consultation, please give our office a call at 858-550-0330. 

 

For a deeper dive into vein and vascular care, please check out our Youtube Channel at this link.

 

For more information on varicose veins and eliminating underlying venous insufficiency, check this link out full of resources.



How does diabetes relate to vascular health?2022-09-19T15:50:54-07:00

How can smoking affect your vascular health?

2022-09-19T15:46:28-07:00

Smoking and Vascular Disease
The reality of cigarettes is that it is not one product. Every time you smoke, you not only ingest nicotine, but hundreds of other deadly chemicals in the tobacco leaf, paper, contaminants and fertilizers used to grow tobacco. Over time the accumulation of these products causes serious harm to multiple organs. And unlike many things in life, moderation in smoking is not a cure.
Benzene, for example, is a substance on the Environmental Protection Agency’s list of national hazards. It is abundant in tobacco smoke and takes more than 32 hours to completely clear the human body. That means that even ONE cigarette a day continues to keep this poison in your system.
What does smoking do to your arteries?
Smoking is the number one preventable cause of death in the United States. Its effect on heart attacks, peripheral vascular disease and strokes is due to the damage that smoking does to the arteries.
The two chemicals in cigarettes that cause the most trouble are nicotine and carbon monoxide. Nicotine, besides being addictive, has very powerful effects on arteries throughout the body. Nicotine is a stimulant, speeding up the heart by about 20 beats per minute with every cigarette. It raises blood pressure and is a vasoconstrictor, which means it makes arteries all over the body become smaller. That makes it harder for the heart to pump blood through the constricted arteries and it causes the body to release its stores of fat and cholesterol into the blood.
Smoking accelerates the hardening and narrowing process in your arteries; it starts earlier and blood clots are two to four times more likely. Smoking lowers your levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and raises your levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. It decreases the movement of cholesterol through the body, and contributes to its accumulation in your arteries. This puts you at a higher risk for heart attack, stroke, and limb loss.
Your vascular health
Cigarette smoking increases risks of blood clots significantly. If the blood clots in an artery and blood can no longer get through, the tissue that is supposed to be supplied with blood has lost the source of its oxygen and nutrients and dies in minutes. This can result in heart attacks, strokes, and gangrene of the leg.

Smoking effects on the brain:
Smoking increases the risk of stroke by narrowing the arteries in the brain and the carotid arteries in the neck that lead to the brain. In addition, the vessels to the brain can become blocked by a clog or blood clot, which can lead to collapse, stroke and paralysis. If the blood vessels are completely blocked to part of the brain, that part will die. Patients may lose the ability to speak, walk or move normally, or, depending on the part of the brain affected, the stroke may be fatal.

“Bringing Experts Together for Unparalleled Vein and Vascular Care”

La Jolla Vein & Vascular (formerly La Jolla Vein Care) is committed to bringing experts together for unparalleled vein and vascular care.

Nisha Bunke, MD, Sarah Lucas, MD, and Elliot DeYoung, MD are specialists who combine their experience and expertise to offer world-class vascular care.

Our accredited center is also a nationally known teaching site and center of excellence.

For more information on treatments and to book a consultation, please give our office a call at 858-550-0330.

For a deeper dive into vein and vascular care, please check out our Youtube Channel at this link.

For more information on varicose veins and eliminating underlying venous insufficiency, check this link out full of resources.

How can smoking affect your vascular health?2022-09-19T15:46:28-07:00
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