Sclerofill Hand Rejuvenation Procedure

The hands can show signs of aging, such as enlarged veins, thinning skin, bony appearance and age spots. Hand veins tend to appear more prominent as one ages due to decreased collagen in the skin. Hand rejuvenation procedures in the past have focused on the removal of hand veins with sclerotherapy. The new concept today is to use an injectable filler

such as Radiesse to stimulate collagen production in the hands to add volume and plump up the skin on the back of the hands, making them appear younger. Radiesse can be used alone to improve the appearance of the hands, or in combination with sclerotherapy of hand veins.

The Sclerofill procedure has been used at La Jolla Vein Care since 2012 for hand rejuvenation. This method combines sclerotherapy of prominent hand veins and the injection of a filler, such as Radiesse to stimulate collagen production. The overall result is more youthful appearing hands.

Video: Spider Vein Sclerotherapy

Watch a video on spider vein treatment with sclerotherapy.

Sclerotherapy is considered the ‘gold standard’ of treatment for leg veins

. Sclerotherapy involves an injection of a medication into the vein.  This will cause the vein to collapse and gradually fade away. Sclerotherapy has been used to treat spider veins for decades, but new solutions such as AscleraTM allow for spider veins to be treated with minimal discomfort and immediate return to activities. Saline solutions are rarely used these days by vein specialists, because alternatives solutions are less painful and better tolerated. Sclerotherapy is preferred by most vein specialists over laser because spider veins often have underlying ‘feeder veins’ that can easily be treated with sclerotherapy, but are not addressed by laser. Many people will require more than one treatment session for optimal results. The national average is 2 to 5 treatment sessions. Wearing compression stockings after treatment will improve results.

What are varicose veins and spider veins?


Spider veins are like varicose veins but smaller. Often, they are red or blue. They can look like tree branches or spiderwebs with their short, jagged lines. This patient had large clusters bluish colored spider veins around the knee (see top picture). These were treated with sclerotherapy injections at La Jolla Vein Care (after picture on bottom). To see how sclerotherapy works, go to La Jolla Vein Care’s Youtube channel.


Varicose veins are bulging, twisted veins located just under the skin. This is a before and after picture of a patient who was treated at La Jolla Vein Care with radiofrequency ablation and foam sclerotherapy to dissolve the varicose veins. There are no surgical incisions with these treatments.

Varicose (VAR-i-kos) veins are enlarged veins that can be blue, red, or flesh-colored. They often look like cords and appear twisted and bulging. They can be swollen and raised above the surface of the skin. Varicose veins are often found on the thighs, backs of the calves, or the inside of the leg. During pregnancy, varicose veins can form around the vagina and buttocks.

Spider veins are like varicose veins but smaller. They also are closer to the surface of the skin than varicose veins. Often, they are red or blue. They can look like tree branches or spiderwebs with their short, jagged lines. They can be found on the legs and face and can cover either a very small or very large area of skin.


Dr. Bunke Explains Non-surgical Varicose Vein Treatments on San Diego News

Vein Stripping is a thing of the past! Watch La Jolla Vein Care’s Dr. Bunke on San Diego Living explain alternative non-surgical vein treatments to the outdated vein stripping surgery!  The episode was aired yesterday, February 10th, on CW’s Channel 6. As Dr. Bunke explains, a common misperception about varicose vein treatment is that vein stripping surgery is still used as the main method used to treat varicose veins. The truth is, vein stripping surgery is nearly obsolete, with endovenous ablation being considered as the standard of care for treatment of the great saphenous and small saphenous veins. There are other treatment methods such as ultrasound guided foam sclerotherapy for the branching, bulging veins at the surface of the skin.

This news segment provides animations about how these vein treatments work.

For the endovenous ablation, specifically radiofrequency ablation of varicose veins, also known as the Venefit procedure (previously called VNUS Closure) is described. Dr. Bunke explains that a thin, flexible tubing called a catheter is placed inside the diseased vein. Radiofrequency energy is delivered to h
eat the vein and seal it shut. The body will gradually dissolve the treated vein. The blood is directed through other healthy veins.

A foam sclerotherapy animation is also shown. Foam sclerotherapy involves injecting a foamed medicine into the vein that will cause it to collapse, shrink and eventually dissolve.

These varicose vein procedures are minimally invasive and can be performed in the office without general anesthesia and almost immediate return to normal activities.



Spider Vein Treatment Animation

A very thin needle is used to inject a sclerosing agent along the varicose vein. Modern medicines used to inject spider veins (sclerosing agents) include polidocanol (Asclera), sodium tetradecyl sulfate (sotradecol) and glycerin. Discuss with your doctor the best type of solution for your veins.

Removing varicose and spider veins has never been easier. Click here to view a 3D animation that explains how sclerotherapy can make your veins disappear—without surgery.

Does Flexible Spending (FSA) and Health Savings Accounts (HSA) Cover Compression Socks?

Does Flexible Spending (FSA) and Health Savings Accounts (HSA) Cover Compression Socks?


Flexible Spending (FSA) and Health Savings Accounts (HSA) Cover Compression Socks and Stockings

Compression socks and compression stockings are considered medical garments that are typically covered expenses Flexible Spending (FSA) and Health Savings Accounts (HSA).  Some FSA and HSA programs expire at the end of the year.  Consider stocking up on  daily compression socks and stockings or even give them as gifts. FSA and HSA cards are accepted at


Thanksgiving Foods That Improve Vascular Health: Chocolate, Wine and Cranberries

How Chocolate, Wine and Cranberries Are Good For Veins

Foods that are rich in flavinoids may improve symptoms of venous disease. Flavonoids help protect plants from environmental toxins and help repair damage. They can be found in a variety of foods, such as fruits and vegetables. When we eat foods rich in flavonoids, it appears that we also benefit from this “antioxidant” power. In addition to having antioxidant qualities, research shows that flavinoids have other potential influences on vascular health, such as lowering blood pressure, improving blood flow to the brain and heart, and making blood platelets less sticky and able to clot.Flavinoids are also well known for their ‘venoactive’ effects on the blood vessels and have been proven to reduce symptoms of venous disease such as leg aching, heaviness and swelling.

Foods that are flavinoid rich include cocoa and chocolate, cranberries, apples, peanuts, onions, tea and red wine.

Remind the cook to use compression socks- long hours of standing in the kitchen can cause leg fatigue, heaviness and swelling.

Happy Thanksgiving.